25 October 2020

COVID Update – Surprise Surge in September Patent Filings

Rising arrowDefying the trend of almost every prior month this year, Australian standard patent filings in September were up by 8.1% on the same period in 2019.  This is the largest positive change for any month in 2020, beating pre-COVID January during which standard applications bested the previous year by 7.7%.  The September surge was driven by filings from all of Australia’s top sources of new applications – i.e. the US, Europe, China, and Japan, along with domestic applicants.  Applications originating elsewhere in the world were down, however, as has been the case throughout much of the year.

The boost in filings for September was dominated by PCT national phase entries, which are now higher by nearly 1% over the seven month period from March to September when compared with the same period in 2019.  At the same time, however, direct standard patent applications – including Convention applications, complete-after-provisional filings, and divisional applications – have fallen by just over 10%.  Most of this decline is in ‘original’ filings (down by over 23%), while the number of divisional applications has fallen only slightly in comparison (down by 1.4%).

Unfortunately, the news for September is not all good.  Australian provisional filings were down by over 11% for the second month in a row, and the third time this year.  Overall, provisional filings have declined by 3% for the seven month period from March to September, when compared with 2019.  The decline is entirely in applications that have been professionally prepared and filed by patent attorneys, which have fallen by 4.4%. The number of self-filed provisional applications is up by 0.6% on the same period last year.

Over in New Zealand, September was an even better month than in Australia, with complete applications up by 13.5%, and provisionals up by 35.6% over the same month last year.

07 October 2020

What Can Patent Data Tell Us About the Australian Government’s Plan for Local Manufacturing?

Building blocksThis is a guest contribution from Mike Lloyd of Patent-Insights.  Mike previously contributed an article on the impact, from an Australian perspective, of COVID-19 on international patent, trade mark, and registered designs filingsFurther details about the author can be found at the end of the article.

The Australian Federal Government on 1 October 2020 announced a renewed focus and A$1.5 billion investment in manufacturing, in particular in the following six target areas of technology:

  1. resources technology and critical minerals;
  2. food and beverages;
  3. medical products;
  4. recycling and clean energy;
  5. defence; and
  6. space.

The arguments put forward by the Government include wanting to ‘focus on areas of strength’ and wanting to avoid the lesson of ‘don't try to do everything’.

There are merits in these arguments, and there are also arguments for letting market forces rather than governments select our area of strengths.

But because this is a patent blog, I want to ask whether patent data can help to find Australia’s areas of technology strength.

There are many ways we could ask this question, and the most obvious of these might be to look at overall patent filings.  However, this is an imperfect method, as this data risks being corrupted by low quality patents, and there are many low quality patents out there.

Another approach is to look for highly-cited patents. The citing of a patent by another is generally a recognition that the cited patent has made a contribution to the patent literature, and therefore technology in general.  The number of citations for a granted patent can range from zero to over a thousand, but as a simple rule, we could say that any granted patent with 50 or more forward citations is ‘highly-cited’.  To put this into context, the commercial patent search database Patseer lists 8.4 million active and granted patent families (a family with one or more currently granted patents), but only 163,000 (1.9%) of these have 50 or more forward citations.  In contrast, 5.1 million (61%) of granted patents have no forward citations at all.

These ‘highly-cited’ patents could be regarded as the most important patents, and the filers of these patents as leading applicants, i.e. strong in their area of technology.  We could also argue that the more of these highly cited patents that companies have, the more they can be regarded as technology leaders in their space.


Copyright © 2014
Creative Commons License
The Patentology Blog by Dr Mark A Summerfield is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Australia License.